Higher Education Courses

Teachers open the door, but you must enter by yourself.

The courses listed below are currently offered by 
Dr. Sean M. HACKETT || HACKETT LABS | Higher Education.

To the greatest extent possible, the design and delivery of these courses are aligned with the Core Purposes of Higher Education as described by former Harvard University President Derek Bok:

“Learning to communicate, learning to think critically, building good character, preparing for citizenship, living with diversity, preparing for global society, developing breadth of interests, and preparing for a career.”


Entrepreneurial Management – I


COURSE DESCRIPTION

This course is about entrepreneurial management. Entrepreneurial Management is the process by which opportunities are transformed into businesses.

Entrepreneurial Management – I (EM-1), focuses on Knowing about topics related to entrepreneurial management in large companies (大手企業). The course is lecture- and discussion-based, requires the use of an online journal, and includes in-class experiential exercises.

This course is positioned as an entry point for students who want to develop an entrepreneurial mindset and become involved in impactful entrepreneurship (i.e. new business creation) in large enterprises but are uncertain how or where to begin.

Additionally, if you want to join a large company and then help it build new businesses so it can compete for the future, EM-1 is an appropriate course for you. Also, if your goal is to get a job offer from a large company before you graduate, the topics discussed in the EM-1 course might be important for you to know before you start interviewing with prospective employers.

This course has two modules:

Module I – Setup
01. Course Introduction;
02. Japanese-style Management; 
03. Business Design I: Problem Finding & Framing; 
04. Business Design II: Problem Solving; 
05. Exponential Organizations & Agile Management;

Module II – Run
06. Preparing for Opportunity Recognition & Self-Management;
07. Business Acumen;
08. Managing Organizational Culture;
09. Cultural Intelligence;
10. High-Output Management & Product Management;
11. Decision-Making & Ethics Across Borders;
12. Negotiation Analysis: An Introduction;
13. Digital-First and Cloud-First Technology Management & Automation;
14. Business Development Managers & Personal Career Development Strategy;
15. Course Wrap-up.

COURSE OBJECTIVE
The objective of this course is to help learners to develop an entrepreneurial mindset.

The Network for Teaching Entrepreneurship defines entrepreneurial mindset as “the set of attitudes, skills and behaviors that students need to succeed academically, personally and professionally. These include: initiative and self-direction, risk-taking, flexibility and adaptability, creativity and innovation, critical thinking and problem solving. Other definitions include the ability to see opportunities, marshal resources and create value.”

An entrepreneurial mindset is a necessary (but not sufficient) condition for being able to help shape organizational culture and drive growth through innovation in global companies and in global startups.

Entrepreneurial Management – II


COURSE DESCRIPTION
The Entrepreneurial Management – II (EM-2) course helps learners to develop a better understanding of how to generate and identify business opportunities, define potential business concepts, refine the business concepts through creativity and business modeling, translate the business concepts into product definitions informed by design thinking and lean startup customer development approaches, and then prepare to drive sales of the products through an online presence.

EM-2 focuses on Doing [practices] related to entrepreneurial management in new businesses and startups. The course is lecture- and discussion-based, requires the use of an online journal, and includes in-class experiential exercises.  

The course is composed of two modules:

Module I – Building Blocks of Entrepreneurship & New Business Creation 
01. Course Introduction + Fundamentals of Entrepreneurship;
02. Nuts & Bolts of Establishing a Business in Tokyo;
03. Opportunity Recognition & Evaluation;
04. Creativity;
05. Segmenting, Targeting, Customer Value Propositioning, and Positioning;
06. Business Models.

Module II – Lean Startups 
07. Design Thinking;
08. Lean Startups & The Business Model Canvas;
09. Customer Experience & Reducing a Startup to a Website; 
10. Leveraging the Cloud & Integrations; 
11. Go-To-Market Strategy;
12. Social Media Marketing; 
13. Viral Video Marketing; 
14. Counterfeiting and System D;
15. Course Wrap-up.

COURSE OBJECTIVE
The objective of this course is to help students to acquire an entrepreneurial mindset. 

An entrepreneurial mindset is a necessary (but not sufficient) condition for being able to help shape organizational culture and drive growth through innovation in global companies and in global startups.

Note: A variation of this course is also offered at another university in Tokyo in a 14 session format with the course name “Entrepreneurship & New Ventures.”

Innovation Management – I


COURSE DESCRIPTION
The Innovation Management – I (IM-1) course introduces students to the fundamentals of innovation management in an era of disruption.

Key topics encountered within this course include:
• Definitions of innovation and innovation management;
• the theory of disruptive innovation;
• organizing for innovation: resources, processes, & capabilities;
• organizational culture;
• building and managing innovation systems;
• new market disruption.

COURSE GOAL & OBJECTIVES
The GOAL of the IM-1 course is to learn about the fundamentals of innovation management from the perspective of disruptive innovation.

The OBJECTIVES for this course include developing the following skills: Critical Thinking, Communication, Team Work, Leadership, and Ethical Reasoning.

Additionally, from a practical perspective, an objective of this course is to strengthen your capacity to make innovation a reality in your organization.

Innovation Management – II


COURSE DESCRIPTION
The Innovation Management – II (IM-2) continues the theme of introducing students to the fundamentals of innovation management in an era of disruption. 

Key topics encountered within this course include:
• competency-destroying technology transitions;
• design-driven innovation;
• blue-ocean strategy;
• the jobs to be done framework;
• business models;
• strategic innovation;
• different ways to innovate;
• systematic inventive thinking (SIT) and innovation sweet spots;
• agile management for innovation
• managing the strategy development process; and
• your purpose to impact plan

COURSE GOAL & OBJECTIVES
The GOAL of the IM-2 course is to learn about the fundamentals of innovation management from the perspective of disruptive innovation.

The OBJECTIVES for this course include developing the following skills: Critical Thinking, Communication, Team Work, Leadership, and Ethical Reasoning.

Additionally, from a practical perspective, an objective of this course is to strengthen your capacity to make innovation a reality in your organization.

International Management – I

International Management – I is designed for students who want to develop a basic understanding of how to conduct business across cultures and borders and how to function effectively and succeed in MNCs.


COURSE DESCRIPTION
International Management – I: Managing Across Borders & Cultures (A) focuses on the management of the multinational corporation (MNC). The primary learning objectives are to help students develop a generalist perspective on how to conduct business across cultures and borders, and how to function effectively and succeed in MNCs. Specifically, this course addresses 1) critical managerial challenges and opportunities faced by MNCs; and 2) knowledge and conceptual frameworks necessary and helpful for managing in MNCs. 

Module 1: The Global Manager’s Environment
In this module we consider the political, economic, and legal environments in which MNCs operate. The topic of ethics in international settings is also addressed.

Module 2: The Cultural Context of Global Management
In this module we consider the role of culture, communicating effectively across cultures, and cross-cultural negotiation and decision-making.

Module 3: Formulating and Implementing Strategy for International and Global Operations
In this module we consider strategy formulation, strategy implementation, and organization and control structures to support implementation.

Module 4: Global Human Resources Management
In this module we consider staffing, training, and compensation for global operations, expatriate career management, and motivating and leading.

International Management – II

International Management – II is designed for students who want to learn how to manage effectively in cross-cultural settings.


COURSE DESCRIPTION
International Management – II: Managing Across Borders & Cultures (B) offers a highly practical perspective on one of today’s most pressing international business issues: how to manage effectively in cross-cultural settings. The first module is generalist in nature; that is, knowledge and insights acquired can be applied in any cross-cultural setting. The second module of the course uses the context of Japanese Business, Culture, & Managing in Japan to highlight the challenges inherent in managing across borders and cultures.

Module 1: Riding the Waves of Culture | Leading with Cultural Intelligence

Cultural Intelligence is the capability to function effectively across national, ethnic, and organizational cultures (Ang & Van Dyne).

In the first module, students learn the fundamentals of Managing Across Borders and Cultures and the Cultural Intelligence (CQ) framework. The learning objective of this module is to begin to build “the skills, sensitivity, and cultural awareness necessary to managing effectively across cultural borders and seize the opportunities diversity brings to an organization.”

Module 2: Applying CQ: Japanese Business, Culture, and Managing in Japan
In the second module, students examine Japanese business, culture, and management practice from the perspective of CQ. The learning objective of this module is to begin developing a mental model of how to collaborate with, manage, and lead Japanese colleagues in a culturally intelligent (CQ) way.


Thesis 1 (A)


COURSE DESCRIPTION
This course is designed to facilitate the thesis proposal writing process. 

Writing a Master’s Thesis is an opportunity to work independently – with guidance – on a research project that you design.

Fundamentally, the thesis process consists of carefully selecting a problem, developing a set of research questions, and crafting a research design that can be used to systematically address these questions.

Writing a thesis requires you to become fearless with regard to candid discussions and feedback as you pursue the Truth. To create a “psychologically safe” fearless space for accelerated learning, this course embraces Radical Candor.

The most efficient approach to writing a Master’s Thesis in a One Year Program of Study is to develop a Thesis Proposal in the first semester, and to write the Thesis in the second semester. Why? Because Chapters One, Two, and Three of the Thesis Proposal also serve as Chapters One, Two, and Three of the Thesis. These chapters include everything up to the point of collecting data. 

Accordingly, in this course, the focus is on developing a Thesis Proposal which consists of the following components:

[TENTATIVE] TITLE

I. CHAPTER ONE – INTRODUCTION
1. Introduction – Provide a brief introduction to your study. The introduction should include the Conceptual Framework that you have created for your study.
1.1 Statement of the [research] problem
1.2 Studies that have addressed the problem
1.2.1 Studies that justify the importance of this study
1.2.2 Distinctions between past studies and this study
1.3 Deficiencies in prior studies
1.3.1 Deficiency #1
1.3.2 Deficiency #2
1.3.3 Deficiency #3
1.3.4 How this study addresses one or more of these deficiencies
1.4 Purpose Statement – The purpose of the research
1.5 Significance of the study
1.5.1 How this study contributes to the body of scholarly research on this topic
1.5.2 How this study contributes to management practice 
1.5.3 How this study contributes to policy making
1.6 Research questions
1.6.1 RQ#1
1.6.2 RQ#2
1.6.3 RQ#3
1.7 Conclusion and Thesis Outline

II. CHAPTER TWO – LITERATURE REVIEW
2. Introduction
2.1 Definition of terms
2.2 Background [of the problem]
2.3 Literature review [academic]
2.3.1 Introduction [of literature review] – use this subsection to explain your approach to conducting your literature review.
2.3.2 Theme 1 – This is a discrete area of research related to your topic.
2.3.3 Theme 2 – This is a discrete area of research related to your topic.
2.3.4 Theme 3 – This is a discrete area of research related to your topic. 
2.3.5 Theme X – This is a discrete area of research related to your topic. 
2.4 Conclusion [of literature review]
Summarize and synthesize the main issues/themes related to your topic area and research questions as identified in the literature.

III. CHAPTER THREE – RESEARCH DESIGN, DATA, METHODS, & LIMITATIONS
3. Introduction
3.1 Overview of Research design & methods
3.1.1 Research Design and Framework. Include a diagram (figure) and a general description of your research design.
3.1.2 Internal & External Validity. Discuss possible threats to internal and external validity, when appropriate.
3.1.3 Variables. List the independent and dependent variables and provide their operational definitions, when appropriate.
3.2 Sample, Population, or Subjects. (When human subjects are involved in the study please describe your participants without revealing their identity unless they gave you written permission to identify them in your thesis.)
3.2.1 Institutional Review Board. Indicate whether Institutional Review Board approvals were required. (Note: Currently, in Japan, most management studies are exempt).
3.2.2 Demographics. Describe participants in the aggregate (i.e. preserve anonymity) with enough detail that readers can make appropriate inferences.
3.2.3 Sampling Procedure. If you used sampling, please describe methods for sample selection in detail. For example if a sample of convenience is used, this should be explicitly stated. Specific inclusion and exclusion criteria should be noted in this section.
3.2.4 Response Rate. If a survey is used, please report the rate of return in this section.
3.3 Measures
3.3.1 Unit of Analysis. The unit of analysis describes the level at which you are conducting your study. According to Michael Harris, “one of the best ways to help identify your unit of analysis is to think about what you want to make recommendations about when you finish your thesis. If you are using a survey, it is helpful to define your unit of analysis before you make your survey so that you are clear in your own mind that what you are measuring with your survey is what you need to measure to successfully complete your study. Typical units of analysis include, but are not limited to, individual, group, organizations, social phenomena, and policies/values/principles.” Contrastively, “a unit of observation is the level at which you are collecting data. For example, you might collect data from individuals (such as through interviews), groups (such as observing a class), or documents. Sometimes the unit of analysis and the unit of observation are the same. But, sometimes they are not the same. For example, “you could study student preparation for final exams by interviewing students in which the unit of analysis is the department and the unit of observation is the individual.”
3.3.2 Survey Instrument. Please describe the survey instrument and its development process in detail. Please provide a copy of the survey instrument as an Appendix.
3.3.3 Interview Protocol. Please describe the interview protocol and its development in detail. Please provide a copy of the survey instrument as an Appendix. (Note: If you conducted interviews before administering your survey, please put your Interview Protocol in 3.3.2 and your Survey Instrument in 3.3.3).
3.3.4 Procedures and Timeline. Please describe the procedures you used to administer the survey and conduct the interviews. should be described in sufficient detail, that a reader could replicate the study if so desired.
3.3.4.1 Survey Administration. If a survey is used, then please include the method of collecting data, the rate of return (i.e. response rate). If a follow-up process was part of your design, please describe the follow-up process as well as a description of the nonresponders.
3.4 Data Analysis
3.4.1 Research Questions/Hypotheses. Restate each research question (and hypothesis if appropriate.).
3.4.1.1. Data Sources & Analytical Frameworks / Techniques / Methods.  Each research question (or hypothesis) should be followed by choice of data source and statistical or other form of analysis used to address each. Include a brief description, the assumptions regarding the statistical or other forms of analysis that will be used, and the rationale for each technique chosen. 
3.5 Ethics and Limitations. Outline the ethical considerations of the research and any [potential] problems and limitations (weaknesses), as well as any [anticipated or actual] threats to the validity of the results.
3.6 Conclusion [of Chapter 3]
Summarize what you did in Chapter 3.

Note: Some sections of Chapter 3 cannot be completed until you have finished your data collection activities.



APPENDIX A
• Copy of Validated Survey Instrument(s) and Interview Protocol(s) to be used in the Data Collection Stage. (Note: This only applies if you are conducting a study that makes use of a Survey Instrument and/or an Interview Protocol).

APPENDIX B
• Tentative work schedule for Chapters IV & V. (Note: As a practical matter, in a one year program, the tentative schedule has already been decided by the time constraints under which we operate).

APPENDIX C
• Working bibliography

THESIS [PROPOSAL] FORMAT
(The Thesis Proposal uses the same formatting rules as the Thesis).

  1. Paper: A4 (single-sided printing)
  2. Length: about 50 pages (or 15,000 words) or more, not including front matter and any appendices.  (Note: This Length requirement applies to the Final Thesis. If your Proposal is longer than 50 pages, that is fine. If your Proposal is shorter than 50 pages, that is fine, too).
  3. Font: Times New Roman, 12 point
  4. Spacing: double-spaced (or about 25 lines per page)
  5. Margins: side (left/right): 3 centimeters/1.25 inches,top/bottom: 3 centimeters/ 1.25 inch



The Thesis Proposal is written in just four months, from April until the second week of July. This means that you need to work consistently every week on your Thesis Proposal or you will not be able to finish by the mid-July Thesis Proposal presentation deadline. 

Importantly, if your research design includes the use of a survey, you must complete the design and validation of your survey instrument (i.e. the questionnaire) by the first week of July so you can begin collecting data during the summer break. It typically takes eight weeks to design and validate a survey instrument; this implies that you must begin working on your survey instrument by the first half of May. In order to do that, you need to complete Chapter 01 by the end of Golden Week (i.e. around May 7th)!

To summarize, an ideal schedule would look like this:

• April 7th – May 7th: Chapter One
• May 8th – July 8th: Chapters Two & Three + Survey Instrument Design & Validation and/or Interview Protocol Development
• July Week 2: Thesis Proposal Presentation (in class)
• July Week 3: Thesis Proposal Submission (last class)
• August 8th – September 14th: Data Collection
• September 15th – September 25th: Preliminary Analysis of Results & Preparing for Mid-Term Report
• October: Chapter Four
• November: Chapter Five
• December: First Draft, Revisions, Proofreading
• January 10th (approx.): Final Version Thesis Submission 
• January 15th (approx): Deadline for submission of manuscript to Academy of Management Conference.
 

Note 1: This course is part of a One Year Program of Study that has been consolidated from a Two Year Program of Study. This fact requires students to exercise great Time Management Skills while participating in this course.

Note 2: Some students like to work on data collection during the summer break; others prefer to take a break. Since the Fall Term starts in the middle of September and the thesis deadline is around January 10th, personally, I think working a little each day in August helps to keep Thesis Deadline Stress & Anxiety (TDSA) at bay in December. 

Note 3: In a world of 7.6 billion people, different researchers often address the same or similar research questions. However, because different researchers use different research designs and/or different data sets, each is addressing the research question in a novel way. I include this point here because it is often a concern for new thesis writers.

Note 4: If you are considering participating in this course and you want to read ahead, please consider reading Research Design: Qualitative, Quantitative, and Mixed Methods Approaches by Creswell & Creswell.

Note 5: Here is a brief, fun Quizlet on Research Methods.

Thesis 1 (B)


COURSE DESCRIPTION
This course is designed to facilitate the completion of a Thesis. The first three chapters are the completed and polished Thesis Proposal which was written in the preceding semester. The remaining two chapters are IV. Results and V. Conclusion

THESIS OUTLINE

I. CHAPTER ONE – INTRODUCTION
II. CHAPTER TWO – LITERATURE REVIEW
III. CHAPTER THREE – RESEARCH DESIGN, DATA, METHODS, & LIMITATIONS

IV. CHAPTER FOUR – RESULTS – This chapter presents the results of the analysis conducted in Chapter III. Typically, results are presented in the order of the research questions (i.e. RQ1, RQ2, RQ3, etc.) [The outline below assumes that you have taken a mixed methods approach for your research design and that you conducted interviews prior to administering a survey. Your research design may be different.]
4. Introduction
4.1 Interview Results
4.1.1 Profile of Interview Subjects (note: do not reveal their identities unless they gave you written permission)
4.1.2 Key Findings from Interviews (mapped to appropriate research questions).
4.2 Survey Results
4.2.1 Profile of Respondents (note: do not reveal their identities unless they gave you written permission)
4.2.2 Descriptive Statistics
4.2.3 Statistical Analyses Results
4.2.4 Key Findings from the Survey (mapped to appropriate research questions)
4.3 Conclusion [of Chapter 4] – Summarize the findings for each research question.

V. CHAPTER FIVE – CONCLUSION
5. Introduction
5.1 Summary & Limitations of the Study
5.1.1 Summarize the results from Chapter 4 briefly.
5.1.2 Discuss the results in non-statistical, easy to understand terms. Provide a table that lists each Research Question, Method, and Result.
5.1.2.1a If you did a deductive study, please provide a figure that shows the Conceptual Framework (or Model) from Chapter 01 and the updated version (based on the results you obtained).
5.1.2.1b If you did an
inductive study, please use your results to generate Propositions which can be converted to testable Hypotheses in future research.
5.1.3 Describe any limitations to your study. For example, was your sample size small?
5.2 Discussion – Discuss the implications of your results. [Were the results you obtained the results you expected to obtain? ]
5.2.1 How does this study contribute to the body of scholarly research on this topic? Do the results support existing theory or received wisdom? Can the results be connected to the literature you reviewed?
5.2.2 How does this study contribute to management practice? Note: This is where you finally get to be a consultant. But, please remember, academic research is very conservative in the sense that you can only make claims based on evidence. The data that you collected have a story to tell, and you get to help the data tell their story. But, you cannot make claims beyond what the data support and you have to be mindful of the Limitations of your study while you are helping the data to tell their story.
5.2.3 How does this study contributes to policy making?
5.3 Future Research – Offer suggestions and recommendations for future research.
5.4 Conclusion [of Chapter 05… and the thesis.]

References (APA formatting)

THESIS FORMAT

  1. Paper: A4 (single-sided printing)
  2. Length: about 50 pages (or 15,000 words) or more, not including front matter and any appendices.
  3. Font: Times New Roman, 12 point
  4. Spacing: double-spaced (or about 25 lines per page)
  5. Margins: side (left/right): 3 centimeters/1.25 inches,top/bottom: 3 centimeters/ 1.25 inch



The last two chapters of the Thesis are written in just two months, from October through the last week of November. This means that you need to work consistently every week on your Thesis, or you will not be able to finish by the internal deadline.

Note: It is true that the deadline for submitting the Thesis to the Program Office is in the second week of January. However, an internal deadline is required so your Professor has enough time to carefully read and determine that your Thesis is suitable for submission. And, the proofreader needs time to proofread your thesis.

Note: This course is part of a One Year Program of Study that has been consolidated from a Two Year Program of Study. This fact requires students to exercise great Time Management Skills while participating in this course.

Note: If you are looking for online sources of information regarding research methods, I recommend the Web Center for Social Research Methods and the USC Libraries Research Guide.