Higher Education Courses

Teachers open the door, but you must enter by yourself.

The courses listed below are currently offered by 
Dr. Sean M. HACKETT / HACKETT LABS Higher Education.

To the greatest extent possible, the design and delivery of these courses are aligned with the Core Purposes of Higher Education as described by former Harvard University President Derek Bok:

“Learning to communicate, learning to think critically, building good character, preparing for citizenship, living with diversity, preparing for global society, developing breadth of interests, and preparing for a career.”


Entrepreneurial Management – I


COURSE DESCRIPTION
This course is about entrepreneurial management as described in Eric Ries’ recent book The Startup Way: How Modern Companies Use Entrepreneurial Management to Transform Culture and Drive Long-Term Growth

The fundamental premise of The Startup Way is that entrepreneurship is a missing function in most mature companies; moreover, companies that embrace entrepreneurial management will be more likely to succeed in their innovation efforts. 

Accordingly, this course focuses on Knowing about topics related to entrepreneurial management in existing businesses; a second course, Entrepreneurial Management – II, focuses on Doing [practices] related to entrepreneurial management in new businesses.

This course has two modules:

Module I – Setup
01. Course Introduction
02. Japanese-style Management (and its focus on execution and operational excellence); 
03. Problem Finding & Framing; 
04. Problem Solving & Business Design; and 
05. Agile Management & Exponential Organizations.

Module II – Run
06. Self-Management & Preparing for Opportunity Recognition
07. Business Acumen, Cultural Intelligence, and a Global Mindset
08. Decision-Making & Ethics
09. Managing Teams: Collaboration, Cooperation, and Persuasion
10. Negotiation Analysis: An Introduction
11. Product Management
12. Cloud-First Technology Management
13. Organizational Culture
14. Personal Career Development Strategy & Business Development Managers
15. Course Wrap-up

COURSE OBJECTIVE
The objective of this course is to help learners to acquire an entrepreneurial mindset. This course is positioned as an entry point for individuals who want to become involved in impactful entrepreneurship but are uncertain how to begin.

The Network for Teaching Entrepreneurship defines entrepreneurial mindset as “the set of attitudes, skills and behaviors that students need to succeed academically, personally and professionally. These include: initiative and self-direction, risk-taking, flexibility and adaptability, creativity and innovation, critical thinking and problem solving. Other definitions include the ability to see opportunities, marshal resources and create value.”

An entrepreneurial mindset is a necessary (but not sufficient) condition for being able to help shape organizational culture and drive growth through innovation in global companies and in global startups.

Entrepreneurial Management – II


COURSE DESCRIPTION
The Entrepreneurial Management – II (EM-2) course helps learners to develop a better understanding of how to generate and identify business opportunities, define potential business concepts, refine the business concepts through creativity and business modeling, translate the business concepts into minimum viable product definitions informed by design thinking and lean startup customer development approaches, and then prepare to drive sales of the products through an online presence.

EM-2 focuses on Doing [practices] related to entrepreneurial management in new businesses. The  course is discussion-based, requires the use of an online journal, and runs on teams. 

The course is composed of two modules:

Module I – Building Blocks of Entrepreneurship & New Business Creation 
01. Course Introduction + Fundamentals of Entrepreneurship;
02. Nuts & Bolts of Establishing a Business in Tokyo;
03. Opportunity Recognition & Evaluation;
04. Creativity;
05. Positioning & Customer Value Propositioning; 
06. Business Models.

Module II – Lean Startups 
07. Design Thinking;
08. Lean Startups & The Business Model Canvas;
09. Customer Experience & Reducing a Startup to a Website; 
10. Leveraging the Cloud & Integrations; 
11. Go-To-Market Strategy;
12. Social Media Marketing; 
13. Viral Video Marketing; 
14. Counterfeiting and System D;
15. Course Wrap-up.

COURSE OBJECTIVE
The objective of this course is to help students to acquire an entrepreneurial mindset. 

An entrepreneurial mindset is a necessary (but not sufficient) condition for being able to help shape organizational culture and drive growth through innovation in global companies and in global startups.

Note 1: A variation of this course is also offered at another university in Tokyo in a 13 session format with the course name “Entrepreneurship & New Ventures.” 

Innovation Management – I


COURSE DESCRIPTION
The Innovation Management – I (IM-1) course introduces students to the fundamentals of designing and developing innovative products in an era of disruption. 

Key topics encountered within this course include:
• the theory of disruptive innovation;
• organizational culture;
• building and managing innovation systems;
• incentives, disincentives, & motivation;
• organizing for innovation: resources, processes, & capabilities; and
• new market disruption.

COURSE GOAL & OBJECTIVES
The GOAL of the IM-1 course is to learn about the fundamentals of designing and developing innovative products.

The OBJECTIVES for this course include developing the following skills: Critical Thinking, Communication, Team Work, Leadership, and Ethical Reasoning. Additionally, from a practical perspective, an objective of this course is to strengthen your capacity to make innovation a reality in your organization.

Innovation Management – II


COURSE DESCRIPTION
The Innovation Management – II (IM-2) continues the theme of introducing students to the fundamentals of designing and developing innovative products in an era of disruption. 

Key topics encountered within this course include:
• the jobs to be done framework;
• business models;
• interdependence & modularity;
• commoditization;
• managing the strategy development process; and
• discovery driven planning.

COURSE GOAL & OBJECTIVES
The GOAL of the IM-2 course is to learn about the fundamentals of designing and developing innovative products.

The OBJECTIVES for this course include developing the following skills: Critical Thinking, Communication, Team Work, Leadership, and Ethical Reasoning. Additionally, from a practical perspective, an objective of this course is to strengthen your capacity to make innovation a reality in your organization.

International Management – I 


COURSE DESCRIPTION
International Management – I: Managing Across Borders & Cultures is designed to provide a highly practical perspective on one of today’s most pressing international business issues: how to manage effectively in cross-cultural settings. An emphasis is placed on managing in Japan, a culturally distinctive place which serves as an excellent contrast to most other cultures. 

Module 1: Cultural Intelligence
In this module participants are introduced to the fundamentals of Culture and the Cultural Intelligence (CQ) framework.

Cultural Intelligence is the capability to function effectively across national, ethnic, and organizational cultures (Ang & Van Dyne).

Module 2: Pre-Departure – Study Abroad, International Business Trips, & Expatriate Assignments
Although the CQ framework can be applied to domestic, multi-culturally diverse organizations, the focus in this course is managing across borders and cultures. Accordingly, in this module we leverage the latest research to explore CQ approaches to preparing for study abroad (self-management) experiences (built to exacting standards), international business trips, and international (expatriate) assignments.

Module 3: Japanese Culture, Business, & Management
In the final module, we examine Japanese culture, business, and management practice as a means to developing a mental model of how to collaborate with, manage, and lead Japanese colleagues in a culturally intelligent (CQ) way.

NOTE: This course has not yet been released. It is listed here for information purposes only.

Thesis 1 (A)


COURSE DESCRIPTION
This course is designed to facilitate the thesis proposal writing process. 

Writing a Master’s Thesis is an opportunity to work independently – with guidance – on a research project that you design.

Fundamentally, the thesis process consists of carefully selecting a problem, developing a set of research questions, and crafting a research design that can be used to systematically address these questions.

Writing a thesis requires you to become fearless with regard to candid discussions and feedback as you pursue the Truth. To create a “psychologically safe” fearless space for accelerated learning, this course embraces Radical Candor.

The most efficient approach to writing a Master’s Thesis in a One Year Program of Study is to develop a Thesis Proposal in the first semester, and to write the Thesis in the second semester. Why? Because Chapters One, Two, and Three of the Thesis Proposal also serve as Chapters One, Two, and Three of the Thesis. These chapters include everything up to the point of collecting data. 

Accordingly, in this course, the focus is on developing a Thesis Proposal which consists of the following components:

[TENTATIVE] TITLE

I. CHAPTER ONE – INTRODUCTION
1. Introduction
1.1 Statement of the [research] problem
1.2 Studies that have addressed the problem
1.2.1 Studies that justify the importance of this study
1.2.2 Distinctions between past studies and this study
1.3 Deficiencies in prior studies
1.3.1 Deficiency #1
1.3.2 Deficiency #2
1.3.3 Deficiency #3
1.3.4 How this study addresses one or more of these deficiencies
1.4 Purpose Statement – The purpose of the research
1.5 Significance of the study
1.5.1 How this study contributes to the body of scholarly research on this topic
1.5.2 How this study contributes to management practice 
1.5.3 How this study contributes to policy making
1.6 Research questions
1.6.1 RQ#1
1.6.2 RQ#2
1.6.3 RQ#3
1.7 Conclusion and Thesis Outline

II. CHAPTER TWO – BACKGROUND
2. Introduction
2.1 Definition of terms
2.2 Background [of the problem]
2.3 Literature review [academic]
2.3.1 Introduction [of literature review]
2.3.2 Theme 1 – This is a discrete area of research related to your topic.
2.3.3 Theme 2 – This is a discrete area of research related to your topic.
2.3.4 Theme 3 – This is a discrete area of research related to your topic. 
2.3.5 Theme X – This is a discrete area of research related to your topic. 
2.3.6 Conclusion of literature review
2.3.6.1 Summarize and synthesize the main issues/themes related to your topic area and research questions as identified in the literature

III. CHAPTER THREE – RESEARCH DESIGN, METHODS, & LIMITATIONS
3. Introduction
3.1 Overview of Research design & methods
3.1.1 Research Design and Framework. Include a diagram (figure) and a general description of your research design.
3.1.2 Internal & External Validity. Discuss possible threats to internal and external validity, when appropriate.
3.1.3 Variables. List the independent and dependent variables and provide their operational definitions, when appropriate.
3.2 Participants (when human subjects are involved in the study)
3.2.1 Institutional Review Board. Indicate whether Institutional Review Board approvals were required. (Note: Currently, in Japan, most management studies are exempt).
3.2.2 Demographics. Describe participants in the aggregate (i.e. preserve anonymity) with enough detail that readers can make appropriate inferences.
3.2.3 Sampling Procedure. Describe methods for sample selection in detail. For example if a sample of convenience is used, this should be explicitly stated. Specific inclusion and exclusion criteria should be noted in this section.
3.2.4 Response Rate. If a survey is used report the rate of return in this section.
3.3 Measures
3.3.1 Survey Instrument. Please describe the survey instrument and its development process in detail. Please provide a copy of the survey instrument as an Appendix.
3.3.2 Interview Protocol. Please describe the interview protocol and its development in detail. Please provide a copy of the survey instrument as an Appendix. (Note: If you conducted interviews before administering your survey, please put your Interview Protocol in 3.3.1 and your Survey Instrument in 3.3.2).
3.3.3 Procedures and Timeline. Please describe the procedures you used to administer the survey and conduct the interviews. should be described in sufficient detail, that a reader could replicate the study if so desired.
3.3.3.1 Survey Administration. If a survey is used, then please include the method of collecting data, the rate of return (i.e. response rate). If a follow-up process was part of your design, please describe the follow-up process as well as a description of the nonresponders.
3.4 Data Analysis
3.4.1 Research Questions/Hypotheses. Restate each research question (and hypothesis if appropriate.).
3.4.1.1. Data Sources & Analytical Frameworks/Techniques/Methods.  Each research question (or hypothesis) should be followed by choice of data source and statistical or other form of analysis used to address each. Include a brief description, the assumptions regarding the statistical or other forms of analysis that will be used, and the rationale for each technique chosen. 
3.5 Ethics and Limitations. Outline the ethical considerations of the research and any [potential] problems and limitations (weaknesses), as well as any [anticipated or actual] threats to the validity of the results.
3.6 Summary [Chapter 3]



APPENDIX A
• Tentative work schedule for Chapters Four & Five.

APPENDIX B
• Working bibliography

The Thesis Proposal is written in just four months, from April until the second week of July. This means that you need to work consistently every week on your Thesis Proposal or you will not be able to finish by the mid-July Thesis Proposal presentation deadline. 

Importantly, if your research design includes the use of a survey, you must complete the design and validation of your survey instrument (i.e. the questionnaire) by the third week of July so you can begin collecting data during the summer break. It typically takes two months to design and validate a survey instrument; this implies that you must begin working on your survey instrument by the middle of May. In order to do that, you need to complete Chapter 01 by the end of Golden Week (i.e. around May 7th)!

To summarize, an ideal schedule would look like this:

• April 7th – May 7th: Chapter One
• May 8th – July 8th: Chapters Two & Three + Survey Instrument Design & Validation
• August 8th – September 8th: Data Collection
• September 8th – September 25th: Preliminary Analysis of Results & Preparing for Mid-Term Report
• October: Chapter Four
• November: Chapter Five
• December: First Draft, Revisions, Proofreading
• January 10th (approx.): Final Draft Thesis Submission 
 

Note 1: This course is part of a One Year Program of Study that has been consolidated from a Two Year Program of Study. This fact requires students to exercise great Time Management Skills while participating in this course.

Note 2: Some students like to work on data collection during the summer break; others prefer to take a break. Since the Fall Term starts in the middle of September and the thesis deadline is around January 10th, personally, I think working a little each day in August helps to keep Thesis Deadline Stress & Anxiety (TDSA) at bay in December. 

Note 3: In a world of 7.6 billion people, different researchers often address the same or similar research questions. However, because different researchers use different research designs and/or different data sets, each is addressing the research question in a novel way. I include this point here because it is often a concern for new thesis writers.

Note 4: If you are considering participating in this course and you want to read ahead, please consider reading Research Design: Qualitative, Quantitative, and Mixed Methods Approaches by Creswell & Creswell.

Thesis 1 (B)


COURSE DESCRIPTION
This course is designed to facilitate the completion of a Thesis which consists of the following chapters:

1) Introduction
2) Background
3) Research Design, Methods, & Limitations
4) Findings
5) Conclusion
Bibliography (APA formatting) 

A typical Thesis is at least 50 A4-sized pages of [double spaced] text (not including front matter and any appendices).

The Thesis is written in just four months from September through the third week of December. This means that you need to work consistently every week on your Thesis, or you will not be able to finish by the mid-December internal deadline.

Note: It is true that the deadline for submitting the Thesis to the Program Office is in the second week of January. However, an internal deadline is required so your Professor has enough time to carefully read and determine that your Thesis is suitable for submission.

Note: This course is part of a One Year Program of Study that has been consolidated from a Two Year Program of Study. This fact requires students to exercise great Time Management Skills while participating in this course.


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